Preston

24 July : Write what you know #wpad

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It’s the easy option, isn’t it? Write what you know, but it’s always a challenge to write about what you don’t know.

I’m only just starting out as a scriptwriter so it makes sense at the moment to write about what I know. First hand experience about a topic is like a nugget of gold as it means that emotions, knowledge and it being realistic will be key to the script.

At the same time I would love to develop my writing further which I know will attract a lot of research going into it prior to writing.

Working full-time limits the amount of time that can be spent researching, and add onto that a part-time degree. But, it’s not impossible and the internet and books provide a wealth of information on all kinds of topics.

This blog prompt made me take a few minutes to dig deep and think about what I do know that I could write about. Like everybody else we all have experiences, sometimes positive and some negative that could be turned into a story.

My current project takes on a vast amount of my life experiences within the context of the six-parts. When the characters were created some of them were based on actors, characters in other dramas and real life people. Some characteristics in the three main characters come from myself, either when I was a teenager and to how I am as a parent to a teenager.

Writing for female characters is also less of a challenge than writing male ones for the obvious reason. But living with three males offers it’s own research as I often will pass bits of dialogue and plot between them and ask if “would that really happen to a man?” However, I can see the benefit of having a writing partner from the opposite sex as both points of view can come through in the writing of certain characters.

Back to my current project, write what you know! The set is based around my nana’s home when she was alive.

I loved the fact that everybody on the estate knew who my nana was. She never locked her door during the day and folk would walk into her house to see her.

I recall during my rebellious teenage years being “chatted up” (am sure it’s not called that now – I must ask the teenager). Anyway I was chatted up by a young man in a nightclub who lived on the same estate as her. It’s a huge estate in Preston, and he lived at the opposite end but he still knew who my nana was – the woman was a legend! I wish I had known that back then and appreciated her more.

The concept of being part of a tight community is what prompted me to write the project.

I couldn’t tell you the names of my neighbours where I live, yet back when I was a child everybody knew everybody in the area. It would be nice to live in a community like that again.

I guess most writing comes from writing what you know, and it sure is fun to make up the other bits.

This is a post for http://www.writesofluid.com blog writing challenge. One blog post a day for all of July.
thurnham road

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I love Manchester Day

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Manchester is my home.

It’s been my home for the past 16 years after I left my previous hometown ofPreston.

Age 21, pregnant and madly in love I drove down the M61 to set up home and start a new life inManchester.

Who would have thought that as well as falling in love with one of it’s sons, I would also fall in love with the City.

 

Manchester is home to me, Preston feels like a distant memory.

My children were born here, I was married here, I went to college and university here and all my jobs have been here.

Yes Manchester– you really are home to me. I like nothing better than taking the tram into the city on a weekend, strolling down Deansgate, sipping coffee and looking at the wonderful buildings.

Today is I love Manchester Day and I for one am in full support of this. I have been wearing my t-shirt with pride and even writing at work with my pen. I would have loved to have stayed in the city tonight for the celebrations – an injury and childcare issues got the better of me.

What a wonderful way to celebrate the city’s response to the terrible riots a couple of weeks ago. It gives the people of Manchester(and our neighbouring Salford) how proud we are of our city.

All Mancunians whether born or adopted should get involved with the cause. Proceeds from the sale from the t-shirts go to Forever Manchester and RECLAIM – two fantastic causes.

The celebrations continue well into the weekend with the Pride parades and my highlight will be watching Formula 1’s Jenson Button racing down Deansgate on Bank Holiday Monday.

I am proud of this city, I just hope that the gutter rats who tried to sabotage it will learn some respect and eventually fall in love with the great city too.

I ♥ Manchester.

Kickin’ it in the Caribbean…….Preston style

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Hundreds of people lined the streets as the Caribbean Carnival parade brought an explosion of vibrant colour and a thump of drums to Preston city centre earlier today.

Brightly coloured-dressed dancers, musicians and DJs took part in a joyful parade through Deepdale, the City Centre and finally ending in Avenham Park.

After a delayed start the convoy left Moor Park to begin their journey down Deepdale Road. They were met by a crowd of keen Prestonians, waving flags, blowing whistles and vuvuzelas to the sound of the steel drums.

Around ten floats blasted out Caribbean beats as dance troupes followed behind.

There were plenty of street vendors selling carnival merchandise to the public – which added to the festival noise of steel drums, African music, freestyling MCs and the trumpets of the vuvuzelas.

Sunday afternoon’s parade kicked off the carnival, which concluded at Avenham Park later in the afternoon.

One member of the public said: “I thought it would be a washout as the rain was so heavy this morning. We were really lucky that it stopped just in time and didn’t spoil the carnival.”

The scene down Church Street before the arrival of the carnival saw an amalgamation of crowds wanting to join in the anticipated celebrations.

The diverse mix of the public shows how Prestonhas become a multi-cultural community that joins together in celebration.

The Caribbean Carnival is now the largest and longest running cultural festivity inPrestonoutside of the Preston Guild. It is well organised, creates a sense of community spirit and has now become a local institution.